Author Photo By Julia Ferraioli, Developer Advocate, Google Compute Engine

Cross-posted from the Google Open Source Blog

Today, we’re announcing that you can now find Google Cloud Platform on GitHub! The GitHub organization for the Google Cloud Platform is your destination for samples and tools relating to App Engine, BigQuery, Compute Engine, Cloud SQL, and Cloud Storage. Most Google Cloud Platform existing open source tools will be migrated to the organization over time. You can quickly get your app running by forking any of our repositories and diving into the code.

Currently, the GitHub organization for the Google Cloud Platform has 36 public repositories, some of which are currently undergoing their initial code reviews, which you can follow on the repo. The Google Cloud Platform Developer Relations Team will be using GitHub to maintain our starter projects, which show how to get started with our APIs using different stacks. We will continue to add repositories that illustrate solutions, such as the classic guest book app on Google App Engine. For good measure, you will also see some tools that will make your life easier, such as an OAuth 2.0 helper.

From getting started with Python on Google Cloud Storage to monitoring your Google Compute Engine instances with App Engine, our GitHub organization is home to it all.

Trick of the trade: to find samples relating to a specific platform, try filtering on the name in the “Find a Repository” text field.

We set up this organization not only to give you an easy way to find and follow our samples, but also to give you a way to get involved and start hacking alongside us. We’ll be monitoring our repositories for any reported issues as well as for pull requests. If you’re interested in seeing what a code review looks like for Google’s open source code, you can follow along with the discussion happening right on the commits.

Let us know about your suggestions for samples. We look forward to seeing what you create!


Julia Ferraioli is a Developer Advocate for Google Compute Engine, based in Seattle. She helps developers harness the power of Google's infrastructure to tackle their computationally intensive processes and jobs. She comes from an industrial background in software engineering, and an academic background in machine learning and assistive technology.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor