As mentioned before, I will be hosting an Ignite at Google I/O on Wednesday, May 27 from 4:15-5:15pm at Moscone West in San Francisco. I'm happy to announce the following nine speakers who will be joining me onstage. In no particular order, here they are - as well as a preview of what they'll be presenting during their five minutes in the hot seat:
  • Leo Dirac - Transhumanism Morality
    Why only geeks and hippies can save the world.

  • Michael Driscoll - Hacking Big Data with the Force of Open Source
    The world is streaming billions of data points per minute. This is Big Data ? capital B, capital D. But capturing data isn't enough. We need tools to make sense of it, to help us better understand -- and predict -- what we click and consume. We want to make hypotheses about the world. And to test hypotheses, we need statistics. We need R.

  • Pamela Fox - My Dad, the Computer Scientist: Growing up Geek

  • Tim Ferriss - The Case for Just Enough: Minimalism Metrics
    Looking at how removing options and elements gets better conversions, etc., looking at screenshots of start-ups I'm working with and real numbers. Some humor (I hope) and fun, both philosophical and tactical.

  • Nitin Borwankar - Law of Gravity for Scaling
    Why did Twitter have scaling problems? I spent 6 months thinking deeply about this and derived a simple formula that a high school student would understand. It demonstrates where the center of gravity is moving in the "Next Web" and why this aggregation of CPU's is even bigger than Google's. And oh yes, it explains how to build a service that scales to 100 million CPU's.

  • Kevin Marks - Why are we bigoted about Social networks?

  • Andrew Hatton - Coding against Cholera
    I'll examine what IT life is like on the front line with Oxfam, a humanitarian agency, and how good code can make a real difference to people's lives in all sorts of ways..some of them surprising..

  • Robin Sloan - How to Predict the Future
    OK, back in 2004 I made a video called "EPIC 2014," predicting the future of media (and Google). It turned out to be 100% CORRECT. No, just kidding. But it made a lot of people think, which is really the point of talking about the future. Turns out there's a whole professional discipline of future forecasting. And there are certain ways you can think about the future that will give you better odds of being right than others.

  • Kathy Sierra - Become Awesome